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Cost-effective universal screening for hepatitis C in France


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An estimated 75,000 people in France are unaware they are infected by hepatitis C virus. An ANRS-funded study by Sylvie Deuffic-Burban, PhD, a research associate at IAME (Infection, Antimicrobials, Modeling, Evolution) (Inserm - Université Paris Diderot - Université Paris 13), and her team show that a universal screening strategy applied to hepatitis C is cost-effective and improves life expectancy in those infected, compared with targeted screening. These modeling results are published in the Journal of Hepatology.

It is currently recommended in Europe that screening for hepatitis C virus (HCV) should target people at high risk of infection. In France, public health data suggest that in 2014 approximately 75,000 people aged 18 to 80 were infected by HCV but were unaware of their status. In at least one in ten cases, these people are at an advanced stage of the disease when diagnosed. Today’s treatments of HCV infection are both highly effective and well-tolerated and cure the infection in a few weeks in over 95 percent of cases. In Professor Yazdan Yazdanpanah’s Inserm research team, Dr. Deuffic-Burban has developed a mathematical model that assesses the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of different screening strategies, including universal screening.

This study applied data from a 2004 InVS seroprevalence survey to 18- to 80-year-olds in France, excluding people with diagnosed chronic HCV infection. The researchers developed their analytical model using a combination of these seroprevalence data and findings from studies of the characteristics of people infected (age, sex, stage of the disease at diagnosis, alcohol intake, etc.), the natural progression of the disease, the efficacy of treatments, the quality of life of the patients treated, and the cost of treatment of infection. The screening strategies assessed targeted the following groups: the at-risk population only; all men aged between 18 and 59; all people aged between 40 and 59; all people aged between 40 and 80; and everyone aged between 18 and 80 (universal screening).

The modeling results show that universal screening is associated with better life expectancy adjusted for quality of life than other strategies. Universal screening is cost-effective if the patients tested for HCV infection are treated rapidly after diagnosis.

Dr. Deuffic-Burban points out that “screening, on an individual basis, enables rapid treatment, which avoids the development of serious complications. In time, collective screening helps eliminate hepatitis C from a population that has been screened without restrictions.” The results of this ANRS-funded study therefore argue in favor of universal screening for HCV in France, followed by immediate treatment of those diagnosed with HCV infection. Dr. Deuffic-Burban concludes that “although our model is unable to test the idea, the epidemiological similarities of HCV, HIV, and HBV suggest that universal and combined screening for these three viruses could be of particular interest.”

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This article is “Assessing the cost-effectiveness of hepatitis C screening strategies in France,” by Sylvie Deuffic-Burban, Alexandre Huneau, Adeline Verleene, Cécile Brouard, Josiane Pillonel, Yann Le Strat, Sabrina Cossais, Françoise Roudot-Thoraval, Valérie Canva, Philippe Mathurin, Daniel Dhumeaux, and Yazdan Yazdanpanah (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhep.2018.05.027). It is published in the Journal of Hepatology by Elsevier.

About ANRS
The ANRS reviews, funds, and coordinates research programs on HIV/AIDS and hepatitis in various fields (basic research, clinical research, public health, vaccination). It brings together researchers and physicians from a whole range of disciplines, in both France and elsewhere. Its annual budget of about 50 million euros is in large part allocated by the ministries of research and health for one-off projects. An autonomous agency of Inserm since 2012, the ANRS funded 500 research projects and grants in 2017. www.anrs.fr

About the Journal of Hepatology
The Journal of Hepatology is the official journal of the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL). It publishes original papers, reviews, case reports, and letters to the Editor concerned with clinical and basic research in the field of hepatology. www.journal-of-hepatology.eu

About EASL
In the fifty plus years since EASL was founded, it has grown from a small organization that played host to 70 participants at its first meeting, to becoming the leading liver association in Europe. EASL attracts the foremost hepatology experts as members and has an impressive track record in promoting research in liver disease, supporting wider education, and promoting changes in European liver policy. www.easl.eu

About Elsevier
Elsevier is a global information analytics business that helps institutions and professionals advance healthcare, open science and improve performance for the benefit of humanity. Elsevier provides digital solutions and tools in the areas of strategic research management, R&D performance, clinical decision support and professional education, including ScienceDirect, Scopus, SciVal, ClinicalKey and Sherpath. Elsevier publishes over 2,500 digitized journals, including The Lancet and Cell, more than 38,000 e-book titles and many iconic reference works, including Gray’s Anatomy. Elsevier is part of RELX Group, a global provider of information and analytics for professionals and business customers across industries. www.elsevier.com


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