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New Web Site All About Fruit Juice Launched


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National Survey Confirms 100 Percent Juice Can Be Part of a Healthy Diet

WASHINGTON (March 13, 2006) – Looking for straightforward facts about how 100 percent fruit juices fit in your diet? A new educational (and non-commercial) resource -- www.fruitjuicefacts.org -- is now online to help answer any questions. The site contains a recap of scientific research along with just pure facts about 100 percent fruit juice.

Why a website just about 100 percent fruit juice? “To help clarify any confusion that may exist about the role these juices can play in a healthful diet,” says Carol Freysinger, Executive Director of the Juice Products Association (JPA). JPA is responsible for the site in addition to sponsoring a recent national survey which found that ninety-five percent of adults are aware that 100 percent fruit juice is rich in vitamins, minerals and nutrients.

The national survey, conducted in December for JPA by Synovate, found that the vast majority of consumers (94%) believe that 100 percent fruit juice can be an important part of a healthy diet. This prevailing opinion is in keeping with the new U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) MyPyramid food guidance program.

When it comes to amounts consumed, recent (USDA) consumption data confirm that children, in particular, are consuming an appropriate amount of juice; USDA statistics show that children have a mean consumption of less than one-half cup of 100 percent juice daily, which is in keeping with recommendations by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). While the calorie content can vary slightly from juice to juice, most 100 percent fruit juices have just 60-80 calories per each one-half cup of nutritionally rich juice.

Americans know how to drink to good health. An overwhelming 95 percent of adult respondents to a recent national survey conducted by Synovate acknowledge that 100 percent fruit juice is rich in vitamins, minerals and nutrients.

“One hundred percent fruit juices also contain an array of phytonutrients that are not listed on the Nutrition Facts panel,” adds JPA’s Freysinger, which sponsored the national survey. These naturally occurring phytonutrients (which essentially means “nutrients from the plant”) are compounds found in fruits, vegetables and other plants that research shows have disease preventative and disease-fighting properties.

2005 was a big year for dietary guidance from the government, which included advice on the importance of consuming more fruits and vegetables. In particular, the scientific report upon which the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans is based recommends that individuals can consume fruit and vegetable juices to obtain recommended amounts of Vitamin A, Vitamin C, folate and potassium.

The Synovate survey also found that the most regularly consumed (i.e., number of occasions weekly) beverages were 100 percent juice and bottled water (milk was not included in the questionnaire). According to the survey, consumers drink juice on five different occasions each week, with children drinking it seven times a week. Recent U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) consumption data confirm that children are not consuming too much an appropriate amount of juice; USDA statistics show that children have a mean consumption of less than one-half cup of 100 percent juice daily, which is in keeping with recommendations by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).

The new USDA MyPyramid food guidance program also is in sync with AAP recommendations for 100 percent juice as part of an overall healthful diet, to which consumers must be listening: 94 percent of survey respondents agree that 100 percent fruit juice can be an important part of a healthy diet.

While the calorie content can vary slightly from juice to juice, most 100 percent fruit juices have only just 60-80 calories per each one-half cup of nutritionally rich juice “Children and adults should consume a healthy, balanced diet that includes a variety of foods in moderation, including juice,” says Freysinger. “This recent research confirms that the message from health professionals is being taken to heart – that 100 percent fruit juice is a healthful beverage and is being consumed in appropriate amounts,” she adds.

For more information about the benefits of 100 percent fruit juices, visit http://www.fruitjuicefacts.org.

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The 2005 survey findings are based on a nationally projectable sample of 1,000 Americans age 18 and older. The survey was completed in December 2005 by Synovate Research Services, Inc., for the Juice Products Association, a non-profit association that is the leading global resource for information about juice products. Sample reliability is +/-3%.



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