What happens to Woolly Mammoths that aren’t needed anymore?

Hundreds of hours go into developing an EMS roadshow truck interior, all helping to bring a brand campaign to life that not only engages with key audiences but leaves a lasting impression on those that have had the opportunity to immerse themselves in this innovative style of campaign.


Ellesmere Port, UK – WEBWIRE – Tuesday, May 13, 2014

We often find that clients are so delighted with the final design and finish of their truck that they make requests for items to be re-homed back at HQ once the show is over, further extending their investment.

Hundreds of hours go into developing an EMS roadshow truck interior, all helping to bring a brand campaign to life that not only engages with key audiences but leaves a lasting impression on those that have had the opportunity to immerse themselves in this innovative style of campaign.

But have you ever wondered happens when the show is over and the trucks roll away? Have you ever been curious as to the fate of those finely tuned stunning display pieces, when they have to make way for the next campaign?
Or, like the New York Times; where that woolly mammoth goes when the curtains are closed on an exhibition?
The New York Times decided to try and find out by approaching Chicago’s Field Museum as well as the Denver Museum of Nature & Science. Their article entitled -‘After the exhibition – finding new uses for displays’ explored how these museums and others granted second lives to exhibition materials.

The article stated how Chicago’s Field Museum commissioned a life-size Columbian mammoth replica for a current travelling exhibit. This was to be made from an eco-friendly water-based resin that would increase durability and grant a longer lifespan, ensuring this mammoth would never go to landfill, or see a mammoth graveyard.

The Denver Museum of Nature & Science, went even further to ensure the longevity of their exhibits and the reuse of exhibition items by recycling tiles from their ‘A Day in Pompeii’ exhibition for use in the ‘Habitat for Humanity’ display. Interestingly, the article also highlighted how some of these museums also ‘upcycled’ their products by fashioning old banners into handbags and laptop cases for the museum gift shops.

EMS reuse, recycle and upcycle as much as they can from one event to the next.

Will Woolner, Production Manager at EMS explains how some clients re-use their products: “We often find that clients are so delighted with the final design and finish of their truck that they make requests for items to be re-homed back at HQ once the show is over, further extending their investment.

It means a lot to find another use for a piece of work once it’s come to the end of its life on the road; the world is changing and brands are more sustainably conscious and want greater value and ROI for their campaigns.
It may be one of our USPs, but it also helps our clients to meet their objectives too.”

With clients such as Lego, Ford, Parker Hannifin and Schlumberger all reusing their EMS displays in a myriad of useful ways such as training centres and showcases, it’s a testament to the high quality of design, flexibility and longevity of the EMS creative marketing solutions.

Contact Event Marketing Solutions today at www.eventms.com to see how their unique roadshow trucks can increase your brands visibility and provide you with sustainable tools that can be used time and time again.



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Kate Price
Marketing Manager
Event Marketing Solutions
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