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Dell Inc. joins EPA in getting the lead out


Dell Inc. has teamed up with the Environmental Protection Agency to help get the lead out of the environment. The Austin-based computer maker has pledged to eliminate more than 19 million pounds of lead from its manufacturing processes as part of EPA’s National Partnership for Environmental Priorities (NPEP).

“Dell is delivering more than cutting-edge computers,” said EPA Regional Administrator Richard E. Greene. “It is also helping EPA blaze new trails in keeping our nation’s children and adults lead-free.”

EPA will welcome its newest partner during the National Resource Conservation & Recovery Act Division Directors meeting in Austin on April 18.

"When it comes to the environment, Dell is committed to leading the industry and maintaining responsibility throughout a product’s entire life cycle,” said David Lear, director of Dell Regulatory, Compliance and Environmental Affairs. “We are honored to expand our relationship with the EPA as a partner in the National Partnership for Environmental Priorities program.”

Dell will achieve the pledged lead reductions by eliminating the cathode ray tube computer monitors it previously manufactured and replacing them with flat screen panels. The switch will cut a total of 19,750,000 pounds of lead and lead compounds and will make Dell the largest reducer of hazardous chemicals in the nation to join the NPEP program.

Dell will also be recognized for its Hurricane Katrina relief efforts. In the aftermath of the storm, Dell worked to provide technology for emergency infrastructure support and evacuee management. The company provided extensive products and support to the affected areas, collected and recycled electronic equipment, and worked with customers, agencies, and government officials to prioritize needs.

NPEP is a voluntary program in which private and public organizations work with EPA to reduce the use of 31 priority chemicals beyond regulatory requirements. These chemicals are long-lasting substances that can build up in the food chain and harm humans and the ecosystem.


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