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OSHA Issues Final Rule to Modernize Workplace Injury Data Collection

The American Board of Industrial Hygiene® (ABIH®) reminds workers and industry of the need to address potential hazards in the workplace to prevent injuries and illnesses.


Lansing, MI – WEBWIRE

Increased attention to workplace safety, improved data collection and analyses, and a more informed public and workforce can help prevent injuries and fatalities.

Last month, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued a final rule to modernize injury data collection to better inform workers, employers, the public and the agency about workplace hazards. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that over three million workers suffer a workplace injury or illness every year.
 
Before the implementation of this new rule, little or no information about worker injuries and illnesses at individual employers was made public or available to OSHA. Under the new rule, which takes effect on January 1st of 2017, certain employers will be required to electronically submit injury and illness data that they are already required to record on their onsite OSHA Injury and Illness forms. Some of the data will be posted to the agency’s website which will help to better inform the public and workers. Posting the data is also intended to encourage employers to improve workplace safety.
 
OSHA’s new compliance schedule for reporting requirements will be phased in over time:

  • Establishments with 250 or more employees in industries covered by the recordkeeping regulation must submit information from their 2016 Form 300A by July 1, 2017. These same employers will be required to submit information from all 2017 forms (300A, 300, and 301) by July 1, 2018. Beginning in 2019 and every year thereafter, the information must be submitted by March 2.

 

  • Establishments with 20-249 employees in certain high-risk industries must submit information from their 2016 Form 300A by July 1, 2017, and their 2017 Form 300A by July 1, 2018. Beginning in 2019 and every year thereafter, the information must be submitted by March 2.

 

  • OSHA State Plan - states must adopt requirements that are substantially identical to the requirements in this final rule within 6 months after publication of this final rule.

 
“Increased attention to workplace safety, improved data collection and analyses, and a more informed public and workforce can help prevent injuries and fatalities,” said Susan Ripple, CIH® and Chair of ABIH®.  “As this type of information is made public, employers will be under more scrutiny about workplace injuries and illnesses. Helping to protect workers and manage many of the premier occupational health and safety programs across the globe are Certified Industrial Hygienists. This elite group of dedicated professionals is uniquely qualified to implement, manage and champion health and safety programs to prevent workplace injuries and illnesses.”
 
To learn more about the American Board of Industrial Hygiene®, Certified Industrial Hygienist® credential or to locate a CIH® to perform industrial hygiene services, please visit www.ABIH.org, email abih@ABIH.org or call (517) 321-2638.
 
About the American Board of Industrial Hygiene ®
Since 1960, ABIH®, a not-for-profit corporation, has been the world’s largest organization for certifying professionals in the practice of industrial hygiene. ABIH® is the premier credentialing body responsible for ensuring high-quality certification including education, experience, examination, certification maintenance and ethics enforcement.  Currently, more than 6800 people in 32 countries are certified to use the CIH® designation.


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 ABIH
 Industrial Hygiene
 CIH
 EHS
 Occupational Health


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