Biofuel plant in UK could influence Norway’s planned completion date of jet fuel factory

As stated by TUJobs, scientists from Sintef believe that the UK’s upcoming Biofuel plant will influence Norway in bringing the planned completion date of its own jet fuel factory from 2020 to an earlier date.


Oslo, Norway – WEBWIRE – Friday, May 09, 2014

As stated by TUJobs, scientists from Sintef believe that the UK’s upcoming Biofuel plant will influence Norway in bringing the planned completion date of its own jet fuel factory from 2020 to an earlier date.
 
According to the article, British Airways has been working to ensure access to Biofuel, also known as Biojet, for the aviation industry. The company is working together with the American Biofuel producer Solena Fuels, and has published specific plans for the construction of a factory that will make Biofuel one of their products.
           
On the site of the proposed plant, in Thurrock, Essex, 575.000 tons of pre-treated waste, which normally would end up at a landfill, will be converted into 120.000 tons of liquid biofuel - about 50.000 tons of this will be Biojet.
 
The airline has committed to buying all of the Biojet commercial production for 11 years, roughly 360 million GBP.
 
A factory for the production of Jet A-1 is set to be built on the site of Follum factories outside Honefoss in the south of Norway. The CEO of Viken Skog, Ragnhild Borchgrenvink, claims that the British plans do not rule out the possibilities of an establishment of a Norwegian factory.
 
Ragnhild Borchgrenvink stated that the aviation industry’s need of Biofuel is so extensive that to be met, it will demand the capacity of production from several locations, and the amount that is being planned to produce will only cover a fraction of the needs of Oslo Airport, Gardermoen.
 
Solena Fuels Corporation has a gasification technology based on plasma technology that is functional in very high temperatures and normally used to destroy hazardous waste. This technology will combine with Fisher-Tropsch chemical processes, which are used in larger scales of fuel production based on gas and coal.
 
A scientist from Sintef explained to Teknisk Ukeblad that, “Solena will use a new Fisher-Tropsch system adapted to smaller volumes of production. But the biomass gasification and the Fisher-Tropsch conversion is not yet commercial, and Solane does not have a site to demonstrate the technology. Although they have been working for 6 years on combining the systems, it is a big risk for the participants to start directly with a full-scale factory.”
 
“If British Airways and Solena are to succeed in demonstrating functional technology, and one that it is profitable, then the technical risk will be significantly smaller for other factories later on, and the interest of investment in this kind of technology will increase,” explained the scientist further.
 
To follow this project as it happens, visit TUjobs.com.



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 Biofuel
 Biofuel Plant
 Jet Fuel Factory
 Biofuel Norway
 Biofuel Plant Norway
Contact Information
Karin Lima
-
TUjobs
karin.lima@tu.no


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