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The Associated Press and The New York City Police Museum present a special photography exhibit in honor of the NYPD and 10th anniversary of Sept. 11


“9/11: A Uniform Response” runs from Sept. 9, 2011 to Jan. 16, 2012

NEW YORK – To mark the 10th anniversary of the tragic events of Sept. 11, The Associated Press and The New York City Police Museum have collaborated on an exhibition of 30 compelling photographs drawn from the AP archives. “9/11: A Uniform Response” will be displayed at the museum from Sept. 9, 2011 through Jan. 16, 2012.

“9/11: A Uniform Response” pays tribute to the New York City Police Department and all first responders, honoring their role on and after Sept. 11. Poignant images taken by award-winning AP photographers depict the morning of the attacks, the courageous response in the days and weeks afterward, the long road to recovery and the building of 1 World Trade Center, formerly known as the Freedom Tower, the rising symbol of rebirth at ground zero. In addition, “9/11: A Uniform Response” features a brief documentary film offering interviews with AP photographers represented in the exhibit.

The photographs instantly recall the devastation and drama of 10 years ago. Suzanne Plunkett captured the horror of people as they raced from the collapsing north tower. In a haunting, black-and-white image now familiar to many, taken after the north tower had fallen, Gulnara Samoilova showed dust-covered New Yorkers making their way through the debris strewn along Fulton Street. Looking south from the elegant Rainbow Room high above Rockefeller Center, veteran AP photographer Marty Lederhandler produced a stunning frame of the Empire State Building, sturdy and unbowed in the foreground, as the stricken twin towers lofted thick plumes of smoke above the chaos farther downtown.

Still other photos reflect the spirit of cooperation and patriotism that Americans showed, such as Beth Keiser’s picture of a young boy waving a flag behind two stoic women police officers during a Yankee Stadium prayer service for victims of the attacks.

“The AP photos, including a few taken by our colleagues at great personal risk, capture frightening scenes of 9/11 and depict the valor of the NYPD,” said Santiago Lyon, the AP’s director of photography. “We’re pleased to work with The New York City Police Museum to present this photographic record to the public.”

“We are delighted to join with The Associated Press in commemoration of the 10th anniversary of Sept. 11,” said Julie Bose, executive director of The New York City Police Museum. “Photojournalism captures moments in time and emotions in a powerful and impactful way. We hope the exhibit offers visitors a chance to remember the courage and bravery that the first responders showed the world that day.”

“9/11: A Uniform Response” will be on view from Sept. 9, 2011 to Jan. 16, 2012. The New York City Police Museum is open Monday to Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday, 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. The museum is located at 100 Old Slip, between Water and South Streets. Admission is free for members, $8 for adults, and $5 for seniors, students and children (free for children under 2 years old). There is no charge for members of the NYPD. For more information on the museum and its exhibits, including directions, please visit:

Target Corp. has provided generous support for the exhibition.

About The AP
The Associated Press is the essential global news network, delivering fast, unbiased news from every corner of the world to all media platforms and formats. Founded in 1846, AP today is the largest and most trusted source of independent news and information. On any given day, more than half the world’s population sees news from AP. On the Net:

About The New York City Police Museum
Incorporated in 1998, The New York City Police Museum is dedicated to preserving the history of the New York City Police Department, the world¹s largest and most famous police service. The Museum strives to be an accessible resource for all the communities of the city of New York. Through its exhibitions, collections and educational programming, the Museum illustrates how the policies and culture of the NYPD have evolved over time to meet the changing needs of the City. The Museum serves as an educational institution, living memorial, and bridge of understanding between the various communities of New York, the international community and the New York City Police Department. For more information, please visit the website at


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