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Siemens wins orders of about €1 billion in advance of the 2010 World Cup


Eighty percent of orders from energy projects in South Africa – Energy needs in Africa immense

Johannesburg, South Africa, Siemens AG has landed orders totaling about €1 billion for infrastructure projects in advance of the 2010 World Cup in South Africa. Most of these orders are connected with the expansion of the country’s energy infrastructure. “Our infrastructure solutions are supporting our partners in South Africa in ensuring the 2010 World Cup will be an emotional highlight for the country,” said Siegfried Russwurm, the member of Siemens’ Managing Board who is responsible for the company’s activities in Africa. “Long after the World Cup is over, the solutions we’re providing in South Africa will continue to bring sustainable improvements in the quality of people’s lives. The products will support the further development of the economy and enhance environmental protection.” Besides contributing a large number of solutions in the areas of power generation and transmission, Siemens is participating in the design of traffic management solutions for mass transit systems and in the improvement of healthcare services. In addition, until now lighting systems from the Siemens subsidiary Osram will be employed in eight of ten World Cup stadiums.

Projects in Siemens’ Energy Sector account for some 80 percent of the company’s orders in advance of the World Cup. Siemens has built efficient new power plants in Capetown and Mossel Bay. These plants will help manage peak loads in the national power grid during the World Cup and secure general energy supplies for the local population and businesses. Other Siemens solutions will ensure the efficient distribution of energy in the South African grid. “These orders demonstrate the strength of Siemens’ portfolio across the entire energy field,” noted Russwurm. Siemens is the world’s only supplier to offer technological solutions from a single source covering everything in the energy field from fuel extraction to the electrical outlet – solutions that must not only be cost-effective but also protect the environment and conserve natural resources.

“The improvement of power supplies is one of the most urgent challenges facing the entire African continent,” added Russwurm. Sustainable expansion will be one of the key drivers of the continent’s future development. The needs are immense: according to the United Nations, some 530 million Africans currently have no access to a power grid. In 20 years, this figure could reach 600 million. Due to aging and poorly maintained power grids, outages are frequent in many regions, lowering the quality of life and directly burdening economic development in the countries affected.

Major events catalyze investment

Major events like the World Cup are a catalyst for further key infrastructure investments in a country. “Our goal is not only to make the World Cup in South Africa a success but also to contribute to the country’s long-term, sustainable development,” said Russwurm. Successful major events require an appropriate infrastructure – not only temporarily in the stadiums. An important lever for a successful major event is the infrastructure of a country, e.g. the network for power supply, transportation and logistic solutions and the healthcare sector.

Stadiums in South Africa are expected to play host to more than 3.5 million people during the World Cup. More than 50 venues, airports and hotels must be linked together. According to a joint study by Siemens and Roland Berger, a major event like the World Cup – with its investments in long-term infrastructure measures serving as a catalyst – generates sustainable growth. The positive effects include a sustainable increase in a country’s GDP and job creation. In South Africa, too, infrastructure solutions from Siemens will continue to support development after the last whistle blows in the 2010 World Cup.

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