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U.S. EPA leads Chromium 101 in San Fernando Valley: Workshop with Calif. agencies will highlight Chromium investigation and cleanup work


SAN FRANCISCO – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency along with the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board and the Calif. Department of Toxic Substances Control will host a workshop for the public on San Fernando Valley Chromium on Monday from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Glendale Civic Auditorium, 1401 North Verdugo Road in Glendale.

Local water purveyors, water system operators, elected officials and the public are invited to hear directly from the agencies the status of investigation and remediation activities to address chromium contamination in the San Fernando Valley.

"I’m pleased that our state and local partners have come together to inform the public of the past, ongoing and future activities related to groundwater protection,” said Wayne Nastri, the EPA’s Administrator for the Pacific Southwest region. “Cleaning up contamination in soil is key to protecting our groundwater resources from further chromium contamination.”

EPA has been active in groundwater cleanup efforts in the San Fernando Valley area since the early 1980s when solvent contamination was first discovered. Last year, EPA launched a focused investigation on chromium groundwater contamination within the Glendale Superfund site area that will lead to clean ups at chromium sources impacting Glendale area groundwater.

In 2007, EPA assumed the lead on 3 chromium source sites and completed a major cleanup at the All Metals Co. site at 264 W. Spazier Ave., in Burbank. The firm specialized in cadmium, copper, nickel, zinc, black-oxide and gold plating of parts.

Starting in 1998, EPA funded a 4-year study conducted by the Regional Water Quality Control Board of the extent of chromium contamination in the San Fernando Valley. This study provided the foundation for future chromium investigation and cleanup efforts.

Chromium is a metal found in natural deposits as ores containing other elements. The greatest use of chromium is in metal alloys such as stainless steel; protective coatings on metal; magnetic tapes; and pigments for paints, cement, paper, rubber, composition floor covering and other materials. Its soluble forms are used in wood preservatives.


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