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Rare pregnancy condition programmes babies to become overweight


Babies born to mothers who suffer from a rare metabolic complication during pregnancy are programmed to be overweight, according to a study published today in the ‘Journal of Clinical Investigation’.

The study is the first to look at the long-term effects on babies born to mothers with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP), also called obstetric cholestasis, a rare complication of pregnancy that is characterised by the build-up of bile acids in the bloodstream.

The findings add to the strong evidence that the environment babies are exposed to in the womb is a major cause of metabolic diseases in adults.

ICP affects up to one in 50 pregnant women in some populations. It is caused by disruption in the flow of bile, a fluid produced by the liver to help with the digestion of fats. This can result in some leakage of bile (and, in particular, bile salts) into the bloodstream, leading to symptoms including persistent itching and complications for both mother and baby.

The researchers looked at a cohort of babies born in northern Finland between 1985 and 1986 and identified 45 babies who were born to mothers with ICP who were a healthy weight and had no other known diseases or complications, such as diabetes.

Although there were no differences in the birth weights of these babies and infants born during the same period from non-cholestatic pregnancies, the team found that by age 16, boys born from cholestatic pregnancies had a much higher body mass index, by up to four points. They also had higher levels of the hormone insulin after a period of fasting, a symptom of type 2 diabetes.

Although the effect in girls was smaller, waist measurements from girls of the same age born to mothers with cholestasis were increased by up to 9 cm and hip measurements by up to 5 cm compared with girls born from non- cholestatic pregnancies.

To further investigate the effects of cholestasis during pregnancy, the researchers created a mouse model of the disease by supplementing the diet of normal mice with cholic acid, a type of bile acid. Mice born from these pregnancies were also more prone to obesity and diabetes, confirming the findings from the human studies.

Dr Georgia Papacleovoulou (Imperial College London), first author of the study, explains: “This is the first evidence that cholestasis during pregnancy can have long-term effects on the health of the baby as it grows into adulthood.”

Both the human and mouse studies revealed an increase in fats and excessive cholesterol transport in placentas from mothers with cholestasis compared with healthy mothers, consistent with a disruption in the metabolism of fats. The researchers propose that this shift in the nutrients supplied by the mother is likely to affect the energy balance in the unborn baby, something that could continue after the baby is born, resulting in an altered metabolism in adult life that could give rise to diseases such as obesity and diabetes.

Using another mouse model, the researchers showed that feeding bile salts to mice during pregnancy resulted in chemical changes to the DNA of the offspring, or epigenetic changes.

Professor Catherine Williamson (Imperial College London and King’s College London), lead author of the study, said: “We don’t yet know the exact mechanisms of how the increase in bile salts in the mothers’ blood programmes the unborn baby towards metabolic disease, but it seems likely that epigenetics plays a role. We need to do more experiments to work out how these chemical changes to the DNA of the baby affect its ability to metabolise fats.”

Dr Alison Cave, Head of Cellular, Developmental and Physiological Sciences at the Wellcome Trust, said: "We’re in the grips of an epidemic of obesity and diabetes, and this study adds to the increasing evidence that suggests that it may not be explained by unhealthy diets and lack of exercise alone.

“We know that the environment that babies are exposed to before they are born can have a huge impact on their health in later life. Studies like this are important to help us develop interventions that might be able to prevent these diseases arising in young adults.”

The study was funded by the Wellcome Trust, Genesis Research Trust, Imperial College London and the National Institute for Health Research Imperial Biomedical Research Centre.

Notes to editors

Women with concerns about ICP can contact the charity ICP Support for information and advice about the condition.

Papacleovoulou G et al. Maternal cholestasis during pregnancy programs metabolic disease in offspring. J Clin Invest 2013 (epub ahead of print).

About the Wellcome Trust
The Wellcome Trust is a global charitable foundation dedicated to achieving extraordinary improvements in human and animal health. It supports the brightest minds in biomedical research and the medical humanities. The Trust’s breadth of support includes public engagement, education and the application of research to improve health. It is independent of both political and commercial interests.

About Imperial College London
Consistently rated amongst the world’s best universities, Imperial College London is a science-based institution with a reputation for excellence in teaching and research that attracts 14,000 students and 6,000 staff of the highest international quality. Innovative research at the College explores the interface between science, medicine, engineering and business, delivering practical solutions that improve quality of life and the environment - underpinned by a dynamic enterprise culture.

Since its foundation in 1907, Imperial’s contributions to society have included the discovery of penicillin, the development of holography and the foundations of fibre optics. This commitment to the application of research for the benefit of all continues today, with current focuses including interdisciplinary collaborations to improve global health, tackle climate change, develop sustainable sources of energy and address security challenges.

In 2007, Imperial College London and Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust formed the UK’s first Academic Health Science Centre. This unique partnership aims to improve the quality of life of patients and populations by taking new discoveries and translating them into new therapies as quickly as possible.

About the National Institute for Health Research
The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) is funded by the Department of Health to improve the health and wealth of the nation through research. Since its establishment in April 2006, the NIHR has transformed research in the NHS. It has increased the volume of applied health research for the benefit of patients and the public, driven faster translation of basic science discoveries into tangible benefits for patients and the economy, and developed and supported the people who conduct and contribute to applied health research. The NIHR plays a key role in the Government’s strategy for economic growth, attracting investment by the life-sciences industries through its world-class infrastructure for health research. Together, the NIHR people, programmes, centres of excellence and systems represent the most integrated health research system in the world.


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