Wednesday News Tips


WEBWIRE – Wednesday, February 06, 2013

New Media Wire via Webwire

Tip Highlights:

NOTE ALL TIMES ARE HAWAII (HT). ALL TIPS ARE EMBARGOED UNTIL THE TIME OF PRESENTATION OR 11 A.M. HT/4 P.M. ET EACH DAY, WHICHEVER COMES FIRST. For more information Feb. 6-8, call the ASA News Media Staff Office at the Hawaii Convention Center: (808) 792-6506. Before or after these dates, call the Communications Office in Dallas at (214) 706-1173. For public inquiries, call (800) AHA-USA1 (242-8721).
 
6:36 a.m. HT/11:36 a.m. ET – Abstract 18 
Target: Stroke program doubled number of patients receiving lifesaving treatment
The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s Target: Stroke quality improvement program doubled the percent of stroke patients who received recommended care within 60 minutes of emergency department arrival, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2013.
 
Massachusetts General Hospital physicians analyzed how using the program’s best practices affected the speed at which 2,589 patients were diagnosed and 289 received treatment with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that’s the only proven treatment for acute ischemic stroke.
 
Current national guidelines recommend that stroke patients receive imaging within 25 minutes and tPA within 60 minutes of arrival at an emergency department. Researchers compared the care before and after the program was implemented.
They found:

11 a.m. HT/4 p.m. ET – Abstract 50
Cocaine use may raise risk for re-bleeds, death in patients with brain bleeds
Acute cocaine use increased the risk of aneurysm re-rupture and in-hospital death among aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage patients, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2013.
 
Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is a stroke that occurs when a weakened area of a blood vessel ruptures and bleeds into the brain .
Researchers reviewed information on 1,134 aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage patients who had been to one of two Johns Hopkins University hospitals between1991-2009, reviewing whether patients had used cocaine within 72 hours of having the stroke. They found:

The reasons for the nearly three times increased adjusted odds of death among the stroke patients who had recently used cocaine warrant further investigation, researchers said.
 
Note: Actual presentation is 12:30 p.m. HT, Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2013.

11 a.m. HT/4 p.m. ET – Abstract WP406
Families of children with stroke face high out-of-pocket costs
The average out of pocket cost a family experiences to care for a child who has an acute stroke is $4,300, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2013.
 
Researchers tracked 22 children who had ischemic stroke for one year, monitoring their families’ stroke-related expenses, including lost wages, non-reimbursed medical costs and mileage.
 
They found:

Aside from medical costs, childhood stroke also creates an under-recognized cost to society due to parents’ decreased productivity and lost hours from work, researchers said.
 
Note: Actual presentation is 4:45 p.m. HT, Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2013.

11 a.m. HT/4 p.m. ET – Abstract WP326
Japanese-style hand bathing may help stroke patients’ well-being 
A Japanese hand therapy technique, in which nurses wash and stimulate patients’ hands in warm water while talking with them, led to improved well-being among strokepatients, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2013.
 
Stroke patients who had hand bathing not only reported being better able to move their hands, but they also talked more positively, became more sociable and had a better sense of contentment and well-being.
 
In a randomized-control study, researchers compared results of 23 recovering stroke patients who received 15 minutes of hand bathing four times within one week to 21 patients who didn’t receive the intervention. They found:

Note: Actual presentation is 4:45 p.m. HT, Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2013.

11 a.m. HT/4 p.m. ET – Abstract WP 425 
6,000 steps a day could keep recurrent stroke away
Stroke survivors who take 6,000 or more steps a day are more likely to remain stroke and vascular-event free than people who walk less than 6,000 steps daily, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2013.
 
Researchers measured daily step counts for 142 ischemic stroke patients, who had strokes six months prior. Looking for results, such as hospitalization due to stroke recurrence, heart attack, severe chest pain or blockages of arteries leading to legs or arms, they found:

Daily physical activity, evaluated by step counts, may help forecast future vascular events among stroke patients, researchers said.
 
Note: Actual presentation is 4:45 p.m. HT, Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2013.
 
Follow news from the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2013 via Twitter @HeartNews#ISC13.
 
 
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Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Stroke Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position.  The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events.  The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content.  Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available atwww.heart.org/corporatefunding.
 
Available B-roll and images related to these tips are on the right column of this link.
 
 



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Contact Information
ASA News Media in Dallas: (214) 706-1173
ASA News Media Office, Feb. 6-8 at the Hawaii Convention Center: (808) 792-6506
For Public Inquiries: (800) AHA-USA1 (242-8721) heart.org and strokeassociation.org
(1) 214-706-1173
ahamediarelations@heart.org


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