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Play safe and follow the law when storing fuel in jerry cans, says Slingsby

With fuel shortages continuing to make headlines as Easter approaches, workplace equipment supplier Slingsby has seen jerry can sales treble over the last fortnight.


With fuel shortages continuing to make headlines as Easter approaches, workplace equipment supplier Slingsby has seen jerry can sales treble over the last fortnight. As a result, the company has compiled a list of safety guidelines for anyone stockpiling fuel at home.
Even though strike action over the Easter bank holiday seems to have been ruled out, the threat of industrial action still looms, with the Unite union looking for guarantees of improved safety standards and working terms for tanker drivers. As a result, petrol retailers in the UK are continuing to report soaring sales and problems replenishing stocks to meet demand.
Lee Wright, Marketing Director at Slingsby, which supplies 35,000 products online and through its catalogues, said: "Sales of jerry cans to the domestic market have gone crazy since talk of a strike by tanker drivers began. When this is combined with the huge volumes of petrol and diesel that fuel retailers have sold in the last few days, and continued fears over potential strike action, it seems that a large proportion of people have listened to the government’s controversial advice and are storing fuel at home.
“We would always advise against stockpiling fuel because the explosion and fire risks can be disastrous, but if someone is adamant that they want to store fuel at home there are a number of guidelines that should always be followed.”
 Slingsby has compiled the following advice that anyone storing fuel should follow:
Approved storage solutions that are specifically designed for fuel must be used. Appropriate containers should be marked and fitted with a secure cap to prevent leakage of liquid and fuel vapours.
The maximum amount of fuel that can be legally stored at a domestic address is 30 litres, which must be kept in two 10 litre metal containers and two plastic containers with a maximum capacity of five litres each. 
Using other combinations of containers, such as three, 10 litre metal containers or six of the five litre containers is illegal.
These limits also apply to any containers kept in vehicles parked in a garage or on a driveway.
Any fuel stored at home should be kept in a garage or shed that is either detached from the main living accommodation or if it is an adjoining building it should be separated by a fire door.
If fuel is left outside it should be no more than six metres from your house.
Never store fuel in the living area of your home.
Below is Slingsby’s most popular jerry can which is available by calling 0800 294 4440 or at
The 5 Litre Metal jerry can
Made from 0.9mm pickled steel sheet. Fuel resistant lining. Locking pin. Choice of 20 litre or 5 litre capacity. Optional pouring spout.
About Slingsby:
Slingsby was established in Bradford during 1893 by Harry Crowther Slingsby who designed and created a range of robust trucks and trolleys to move heavy loads horizontally around large buildings. Several members of the Slingsby family remain on the board of directors and whilst the company is still famous for its manual handling equipment, it now supplies more than 35,000 workplace products to a full range of industries via its catalogues and website.
For further information contact
Steve Wright
0113 2576633


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